Natural Blood Pressure Management – My Interview with Dr …

http://www.healthquestpodcast.com/ Sun, 26 Jul 2015 16:02:49 -0700

Lower_BP_in_8_weeks In this interview Dr. Stephen Sinatra discusses how to manage blood pressure naturally. As a metabolic cardiologist Dr. Sinatra is well qualified to discuss how you can use lifestyle and nutrition to naturally improve and …

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fasting blood sugar testThe fasting blood sugar test will actually tell you more about your risk of heart disease than your cholesterol profile. Are you surprised?

Don’t be! While this is not a “cholesterol test,” it IS an important marker for heart disease risk!

Sugar is intimately involved with inflammation, and as we know, it is inflammation that is the real culprit in heart disease, cholesterol is just along for the ride!

According to Dr. Mark Houston associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University, for every additional point above 75 on your fasting blood sugar reading, your risk of heart disease goes up!

This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels in your blood are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

The impact of elevated blood glucose levels

Sugar is a killer, a serial killer, where your health is concerned. Medical science is just now starting to figure out how damaging sugar can be in your system when the levels are high.

There are a number of reasons for this:

  • High blood sugar causes increased insulin (which is a pro-inflammatory hormone)
  • Elevated sugar levels make your blood more acidic and it tends to clot more readily
  • Sugar causes stiffening of arteries and blood vessels
  • Sugar decreases the oxygen carrying capacity of your blood
  • Nitric oxide is vital for heart health and high sugar levels lower it
  • High sugar levels also cause glycation which is a hardening of tissues in your heart and arteries

For all the reasons above, it’s important to know what your blood sugar levels are, so that if they are high, you can make the necessary changes that will bring the level down and reduce your risk of heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure.

How is the test performed?

A fasting blood sugar test, which is also called a fasting plasma glucose, or FPG test, measures your blood glucose level after you have fasted for at least 8 hours.

It’s a very accurate test, and does not vary by age or how physically active you are. It tends to be a physician favorite because it’s easy to do, cheap, and you get the results relatively fast.

The test is done first thing in the morning (so you can get the results by the afternoon), after at least an 8 hour period with no food, and nothing to drink but water.

A nurse or physician assistant will draw your blood and send the sample to the lab. When the results come back your doctor will discuss with you what the results mean, in terms of your risk for both heart disease and diabetes.

Levels for these tests are expressed in “millgrams per deciliter” (a deciliter is one 10th of a liter). Thus a reading of 100mg/dl is read as 100 milligrams per deciliter.

The threshold for normal fasting sugar levels should be below 100mg/dl, but some experts, most notably Dr. Mark Houston, feel the safe level is 70 -75 mg/dl!

What do the scores mean?

Doctors use what are called “reference ranges” to determine exactly what these tests indicate. All of this is of course relative to the results taken of sample populations to determine what is statistically healthy and what is not.

There are cut off points beyond which a clinical diagnosis is made, and these would appear to be splitting hairs so to speak, but of course the line must be drawn somewhere.  Whatever the result, you will have a much better idea of where you stand, and what you have to do to protect your health in the long term.

If your blood sugar measures between 100 mg/dl to 125 mg/dl, the doctor will probably order a follow-up test to eliminate error. This test result indicates “pre-diabetes” and your doctor may want to discuss steps you can take to bring your sugar levels down and prevent diabetes.

If you score 126mg/dl or above, the doctor will want to test you again to eliminate the chance of some anomaly that might have caused an inaccurate reading. If a follow-up test scores the same result, this will confirm that you are diabetic!

Of course it may seem silly to say that if your result on this test is 125mg/dl you don’t have diabetes and at 126 mg/dl you ARE diabetic, but they had to make a cut off point somewhere.

What is important is that if you are in the range 100-125 you need to make changes to your nutrition and exercise habits to get your blood sugar down to healthy levels.

Insulin is a factor too!

When your blood sugar levels spike, your body produces insulin to lower the sugar level. So if your fasting blood sugar test indicates higher than normal blood sugar levels, you can be sure your insulin levels are high as well.

Insulin is a very pro-inflammatory hormone that causes a lot of problems in your body when it is chronically elevated. This is another reason why you would want to get your sugar levels down to what is considered healthy.

Insulin causes inflammation and damage to the endothelial lining of your arteries, which is how the process of atherosclerosis begins. Thus your sugar levels have a direct bearing on the development of heart disease.

Connection with heart disease

If your blood glucose levels are chronically elevated, a process called glycation comes into play, which causes tissues like the heart and blood vessels to lose elasticity and become stiff.

This stiffening process, along with the damage from inflammation, makes you susceptible to heart attacks, high blood pressure and strokes.

To make it really simple and clear, elevated blood sugar=heart disease! This connection is far more important than cholesterol which does not directly cause heart disease. High blood glucose levels are also a factor in many other chronic diseases as well.

The fasting blood sugar test, by measuring how high your blood sugar is on average gives you a clear indication that your risk for heart disease is elevated, which in turn gives you a chance to lower your risk and avoid heart disease, by bringing your blood sugar levels down.

cholesterol lowering foods

 

Cholesterol lowering foods have a lot more benefits than just promoting good cholesterol levels. Foods to lower cholesterol often have antioxidant and anti inflammatory benefits as well. These foods will help you lower cholesterol naturally, maintain a stable weight, fight disease, and add healthy years to your life!

Some of these foods you will be familiar with, and some may be knew to you, but the point is that you will have a wide variety of tasty foods to choose from, and they will result in better cholesterol numbers as well as reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes.

Good cholesterol levels can be promoted in many ways, and your diet is a huge factor in what your cholesterol profile looks like. Focusing on cholesterol lowering foods is a great strategy because the reductions in cholesterol numbers will happen automatically just by eating certain foods.

Cholesterol lowering foods:

Foods to lower cholesterol work in several ways:

  • Foods with high fiber
    • Fruits like apples, pears, coconut, guava, grapefruit, berries, figs, apricots
    • Vegetables like greens, sprouts, squash, eggplant, green beans, and peppers
    • Whole oats, beans, legumes, lentils, peanuts
    • Nuts and seeds of all kinds
  • Foods that provide beneficial fats
    • Chicken, turkey
    • Free range grass fed meat, salmon and cold water fish
    • Avacados, olives
    • Nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters
  • Foods that provide antioxidant protection
    • Spices like curcumin (curry), cloves, cinnamon, oregano, nutmeg, chilli powder
    • Nuts such as peanuts, hazelnuts, pecans, walnuts, sunflower and pumpkin seeds
    • Onions, garlic, chilli peppers
    • Dark skinned vegetables, fruits like grapes and berries

These are ALL cholesterol lowering foods, and they work in different ways. They all contribute to better nutrition, digestion, and antioxidant status. These are healthy ways to achieve good cholesterol levels, rather than depending on toxic medication that often have severe side effects.

The foods listed above help lower blood sugar, which in turn lowers insulin (a very important aspect of heart health). some cholesterol lowering foods bind with bile acids containing cholesterol and help flush it from the body. They protect blood vessels from the effects of inflammation due to the antioxidants they contain.

This is the most important relationship between cholesterol and diet, not just how much cholesterol is contained in the foods you eat. Blood glucose levels affect your cholesterol profile, so any foods which lower blood sugar are beneficial in promoting good cholesterol levels.

Some of these cholesterol lowering foods also raise HDL! This is especially important because it is the HDL/LDL ratio that determines your risk of heart disease. So raising HDL is critical to protecting your cardiovascular system from the effects of inflammation.

When we talk about foods to lower cholesterol, these are ideally foods in their raw and natural state. Some foods do have to be cooked for safety, but when you can eat foods raw and unprocessed, so much the better.

Good cholesterol levels are generally defined as total cholesterol between 160mg/dl and 180mg/dl, with an HDL level of over 45mg/dl. Cholesterol CAN be TOO low, which is dangerous as well because it is associated with increased risk of serious illness, even heart disease!

The point of all this is that using cholesterol lowering foods to reduce cholesterol levels will allow you to do it naturally, so that your body will optimize it’s cholesterol production rather than using drugs to artificially lower it.

To sum up one again the 3 benefits of cholesterol lowering foods:

  • Foods that provide fiber to bind cholesterol and eliminate it from your body
  • Foods that provide beneficial fats to balance hormones and inflammatory pathways
  • Foods that provide antioxidants benefits to protect against free radicals and oxidative stress

The relationship between cholesterol and diet really depends on the above three factors. A diet that fails to do those things, is associated with high cholesterol levels, because your body is not functioning optimally.

Cholesterol lowering foods can do all of these things and more. They will promote longevity and good health, allowing you to avoid the devastating effects of cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. Yes foods to lower cholesterol can do all that, so enjoy them in good health.

pantothenic acid capsulesPantothenic acid benefits are not well known to most people but they have important effects on your cardiovascular health. D-calcium pantothenate is helpful in raising HDL cholesterol level, which helps lower your risk of heart disease.

Since the cutting edge in modern medicine involves the use of targeted nutritional supplements to fight disease rather than defaulting to drugs as a first resort, we need to become familiar with some key nutrients and learn how they can help protect against heart disease!

What is pantothenic acid?

D-calcium pantothenate or pantothenic acid is a water soluble b-vitamin (vitamin-b5). It is a very important nutrient and is a precursor to coenzyme A. Coenzyme A is utilized in the metabolism of carbohydrates, and the synthesis of fatty acids, and steroid hormones.

Deficiency of this vitamin in human beings is rare and usually only occurs in bad cases of malnutrition. Symptoms of deficiency include numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, fatigue, headaches, and insomnia.

Pantothenic acid benefits

There are a number of well documented health benefits associated with d-calcium pantothenate such as:

  • Raises HDL cholesterol level
  • Improves skin tone
  • Accelerates healing
  • Protects against lipid peroxidation
  • Increases energy levels
  • Accelerates post surgery healing
  • Helps healing after burn injuries
  • Enhances epithelial function

The most important of the pantothenic acid benefits is it’s ability to raise HDL levels. This is what most directly affects your risk of heart disease. Pantethine is the active form of vitamin B5. Clinical research studies show that pantethine can reduce triglycerides and cholesterol levels and increase HDL levels at the same time.

Food sources of d-calcium pantothenate

Pantothenic acid can be found in common foods and also taken in supplement form. You can get it in the following foods:

  • Meats
  • Whole grains
  • Egg yolks
  • Vegetables like broccoli and avocado
  • Rice
  • Cold water fish

Pantothenic acid benefits can also come from supplements of d-calcium panothenate taken in dosages of 50-100 mg per day. There is no known toxicity threshold for this nutrient and dosages of several grams per day have been reported as having beneficial effects with no signs of toxicity.

Since few doctors are familiar with nutritional supplements and how they should be used, your doctor will probably not be receptive to the idea or know just how these nutrients should be incorporated into your diet.

You should seek the advice of a doctor who practices complementary and integrative medicine, as the best person to advise you in this area. These doctors combine traditional treatments with nutrition and holistic therapies, to get the best results of both approaches.

The best approach is to calibrate the dosage with how you feel and what your objectives are. Raising HDL cholesterol is the most notable of d-calcium pantothenate effects, and you should adjust your dosage to optimize your HDL levels. You may want to have your HDL cholesterol checked to provide a baseline to compare against. This way you will know if it is working.

Pantothenic acid benefits are that this powerful nutrient can help optimize your cholesterol profile and significantly lower your risk of heart disease. It is non toxic and vital to energy production. When you add this vitamin to your nutritional regimen you will significantly improve the quality of your life.

cholesterol reducing drugsCholesterol reducing drugs are huge sellers for the drug industry, but are they safe? Cholesterol reducing drugs or cholesterol meds as they are referred to artificially lower cholesterol.

High cholesterol medication may not effectively prevent heart disease, and each new cholesterol drug seems to have it’s share of dangerous side effects.

Mainstream medicine’s reliance on medication for bringing down high cholesterol levels may very well be unfounded. Funding for research studies into the effectiveness of these drugs is often conducted by the very companies that stand to profit if the drug is approved. This is a huge conflict of interest, and it may even mean that the claims made for the effectiveness of cholesterol lowering medication are exaggerated or false.

The most popular class of cholesterol reducing drugs are called statins. They are taken by more than 25 million people around the world to lower cholesterol. In fact, the statin drug called Lipitor is the most widely prescribed drug in the world!

Some of the brand names of these statins are:

  • Lipitor
  • Pravachol
  • Vytorin
  • Zocor
  • Crestor

These drugs and many other cholesterol meds work by inhibiting an enzyme called HMG-CoA reductase, that is responsible for the production of cholesterol your liver. These drugs actually replace the HMG-CoA in your liver, which triggers the production of what are called LDL receptors, which attach to the cholesterol molecules and transport them to the liver where they are deactivated.

The problem with using these drugs to lower your cholesterol levels is twofold:

  • They are toxic and damage your liver
  • Your body actually needs cholesterol for many important biochemical reactions

Thus lowering your cholesterol by interfering with the production of this vital substance in your body is a dangerous practice that an increasing number of doctors feel is not worth the risk of side effects that these Cholesterol reducing drugs cause.

Statins contained in medicine to lower cholesterol, deplete a substance in your body called coenzyme q-10 which is used in many vital chemical processes in the body. One drug company was even working on a synthetic form of coenzyme q-10 that would be part of their cholesterol medicine, in order to prevent deficiencies of q-10 from causing side effects in the people taking their statin drugs.

However this product containing supplementary coenzyme q-10 never made it to commercial production. So when people take statins, they become deficient in this critical nutrient, and are not even aware they are at risk for some serious problems such as cancer, cardio myopathy, and Alzheimer’s disease, to name a few.

It goes without saying that anyone taking medicine to lower cholesterol should be taking supplementary coenzyme q-10 to protect themselves from deficiency cause by statin drugs.

Some health experts feel that the increases in cases of cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, rhabdomylosis (a medical condition that causes muscle breakdown), are due to the widespread use of cholesterol reducing drugs containing statins. Some doctors continue to aggressively promote and prescribe these drugs to their patients.

However other physicians, alarmed at the side effects of statins they are seeing, believe that the risks of these drugs are so great that their use in supposedly preventing heart disease is not justified.

Some of the warning signs of serious side effects are:

  • Persistent muscle pain
  • Numbness in fingers and toes
  • Loss of memory
  • Headache
  • Weakness or lack of energy
  • Rashes
  • Dark colored urine

These are just some of the signs that you are experiencing potentially serious side effects from a new cholesterol drug you are taking. These symptoms should be reported to your doctor right away. If the doctor you are seeing does not take them seriously or seem concerned, you should change doctors.

Cholesterol reducing drugs can have deadly side effects. It is best to pursue ways to lower cholesterol without dangerous drugs. Seek out a doctor that is knowledgeable about nutrition and natural ways to lower cholesterol. It just may save your life!

What is Cholesterol

What is cholesterol? Among other things it is a very much misunderstood substance that people have been unnecessarily frightened of. They have been told repeatedly by “experts and authorities” that it’s a dangerous substance, that must be lowered in your body before it kills you!

what is cholesterolIn this information website, we will try and demystify this perfectly natural substance and disprove once and for all that it causes heart disease! We will also provide good solid information and easy to implement strategies that will help you prevent heart disease instead of just “lowering cholesterol.”

Let’s start with a discussion of  what is cholesterol…

Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that is made in the liver. It’s part of a class of compounds called steroids which are made in the bodies of all animals. This substance is vital to your body, is transported through the blood, and is contained in the external layers of all cells.

The origin of the word cholesterol originally comes from the word chole which means bile in Greek. The other part of the word derives from the Greek word stereos meaning stiff or solid. This waxy fatty substance is necessary for your cells to maintain their structural integrity.

This is why it is absolutely vital for life, and in fact your body actually manufactures this substance for use in all of your cells. Statin drugs interfere with the production of cholesterol which is why they cause so many side effects.

What is cholesterol used for?

There are many functions for this amazing substance:

  • It is used in creating the myelin that coats and protects your nerves somewhat like the insulation on a wire.
  • It is used for synthesizing bile acids which your body needs for digestion.
  • Your body uses it to make sex hormones (androgens and estrogens) and also in the synthesis of the adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • It’s used in to metabolize vitamins A, D, E, and K (the fat soluble vitamins)
  • It is used in the reactions that synthesize vitamin D from sunlight.
  • It’s essential for maintaining the outer structural layer of your cells and also for keeping the cell membranes permeable so that certain molecules can pass through the membrane and enter the cell.

In order to travel through your bloodstream, it needs to have a protein coating and thus becomes something called a “lipoprotein.” They are called lipoprotiens because they contain both protein and fat.

The four main types of these lipoproteins are:

  1. LDL or low density lipoproteins often called bad and are associated with an increased risk of heart disease when they are high
  2. Chylomicrons (triglycerides) consisting of approximately 90%  fat
  3. HDL or high density lipoproteins (often referred to as the “good cholesterol”) HDL is thought to “protect” the arteries from damage by carrying away LDL particles so they can’t build up on your artery walls.
  4. VLDL or very low-density lipoproteins (often referred to as a very bad form of lipoproteins) These particles are considered to have the highest risk of contributing to heart disease because they are small dense highly inflammatory particles that can damage artery walls.

The role of triglycerides…

Triglycerides are fat molecules that come from the fat in the foods we eat, or can be synthesized from carbohydrates that are not burned for energy. These triglycerides are stored in your body and released to be burned for energy when your body does not get enough food to meet it’s energy needs. The truth is that it is triglycerides that really increase the risk of heart disease!
Hypertriglyceridemia is a term used to refer to high levels of triglyceries in the blood and researchers now know that this is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High glycemic carbohydrates can raise levels of triglycerides and greatly increase risk of heart disease.

While this area is still somewhat controversial, it’s clear that triglycerides have a major role in heart disease and they are increased by sugar consumption. It makes sense for this reason to keep your intake of sugar and high glycemic carbohydrates low to avoid setting yourself up for cardiovascular disease.

A Complex Question…

Doctors have been taught to calculate your risk of heart disease using ratios of these lipoprotein particles. They have also been given guidelines for what the “safe” and “dangerous” levels are.  Now these guidelines have been called into question, as new information has changed what the medical community “thought” they knew!

Even though the question of  what is cholesterol is a complex one, you will see that terms like good  and bad cholesterol are misleading and inaccurate. All of these forms of this vital substance have their necessary roles. Instead we should be looking at the effects of chronic inflammation and how we can neutralize it, because it is really inflammation that causes heart disease!

References:

Curr Cardiol Rep. 2011 Dec;13(6):544-52. doi: 10.1007/s11886-011-0220-3.
The role of triglycerides in atherosclerosis. Talayero BG, Sacks FM.
Source: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. btalayer@hsph.harvard.edu