cholesterol lowering foods

 

Cholesterol lowering foods have a lot more benefits than just promoting good cholesterol levels. Foods to lower cholesterol often have antioxidant and anti inflammatory benefits as well. These foods will help you lower cholesterol naturally, maintain a stable weight, fight disease, and add healthy years to your life!

Some of these foods you will be familiar with, and some may be knew to you, but the point is that you will have a wide variety of tasty foods to choose from, and they will result in better cholesterol numbers as well as reduced risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes.

Good cholesterol levels can be promoted in many ways, and your diet is a huge factor in what your cholesterol profile looks like. Focusing on cholesterol lowering foods is a great strategy because the reductions in cholesterol numbers will happen automatically just by eating certain foods.

Cholesterol lowering foods:

Foods to lower cholesterol work in several ways:

  • Foods with high fiber
    • Fruits like apples, pears, coconut, guava, grapefruit, berries, figs, apricots
    • Vegetables like greens, sprouts, squash, eggplant, green beans, and peppers
    • Whole oats, beans, legumes, lentils, peanuts
    • Nuts and seeds of all kinds
  • Foods that provide beneficial fats
    • Chicken, turkey
    • Free range grass fed meat, salmon and cold water fish
    • Avacados, olives
    • Nuts, nut butters, seeds, seed butters
  • Foods that provide antioxidant protection
    • Spices like curcumin (curry), cloves, cinnamon, oregano, nutmeg, chilli powder
    • Nuts such as peanuts, hazelnuts, pecans, walnuts, sunflower and pumpkin seeds
    • Onions, garlic, chilli peppers
    • Dark skinned vegetables, fruits like grapes and berries

These are ALL cholesterol lowering foods, and they work in different ways. They all contribute to better nutrition, digestion, and antioxidant status. These are healthy ways to achieve good cholesterol levels, rather than depending on toxic medication that often have severe side effects.

The foods listed above help lower blood sugar, which in turn lowers insulin (a very important aspect of heart health). some cholesterol lowering foods bind with bile acids containing cholesterol and help flush it from the body. They protect blood vessels from the effects of inflammation due to the antioxidants they contain.

This is the most important relationship between cholesterol and diet, not just how much cholesterol is contained in the foods you eat. Blood glucose levels affect your cholesterol profile, so any foods which lower blood sugar are beneficial in promoting good cholesterol levels.

Some of these cholesterol lowering foods also raise HDL! This is especially important because it is the HDL/LDL ratio that determines your risk of heart disease. So raising HDL is critical to protecting your cardiovascular system from the effects of inflammation.

When we talk about foods to lower cholesterol, these are ideally foods in their raw and natural state. Some foods do have to be cooked for safety, but when you can eat foods raw and unprocessed, so much the better.

Good cholesterol levels are generally defined as total cholesterol between 160mg/dl and 180mg/dl, with an HDL level of over 45mg/dl. Cholesterol CAN be TOO low, which is dangerous as well because it is associated with increased risk of serious illness, even heart disease!

The point of all this is that using cholesterol lowering foods to reduce cholesterol levels will allow you to do it naturally, so that your body will optimize it’s cholesterol production rather than using drugs to artificially lower it.

To sum up one again the 3 benefits of cholesterol lowering foods:

  • Foods that provide fiber to bind cholesterol and eliminate it from your body
  • Foods that provide beneficial fats to balance hormones and inflammatory pathways
  • Foods that provide antioxidants benefits to protect against free radicals and oxidative stress

The relationship between cholesterol and diet really depends on the above three factors. A diet that fails to do those things, is associated with high cholesterol levels, because your body is not functioning optimally.

Cholesterol lowering foods can do all of these things and more. They will promote longevity and good health, allowing you to avoid the devastating effects of cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. Yes foods to lower cholesterol can do all that, so enjoy them in good health.

What is Cholesterol

What is cholesterol? Among other things it is a very much misunderstood substance that people have been unnecessarily frightened of. They have been told repeatedly by “experts and authorities” that it’s a dangerous substance, that must be lowered in your body before it kills you!

what is cholesterolIn this information website, we will try and demystify this perfectly natural substance and disprove once and for all that it causes heart disease! We will also provide good solid information and easy to implement strategies that will help you prevent heart disease instead of just “lowering cholesterol.”

Let’s start with a discussion of  what is cholesterol…

Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that is made in the liver. It’s part of a class of compounds called steroids which are made in the bodies of all animals. This substance is vital to your body, is transported through the blood, and is contained in the external layers of all cells.

The origin of the word cholesterol originally comes from the word chole which means bile in Greek. The other part of the word derives from the Greek word stereos meaning stiff or solid. This waxy fatty substance is necessary for your cells to maintain their structural integrity.

This is why it is absolutely vital for life, and in fact your body actually manufactures this substance for use in all of your cells. Statin drugs interfere with the production of cholesterol which is why they cause so many side effects.

What is cholesterol used for?

There are many functions for this amazing substance:

  • It is used in creating the myelin that coats and protects your nerves somewhat like the insulation on a wire.
  • It is used for synthesizing bile acids which your body needs for digestion.
  • Your body uses it to make sex hormones (androgens and estrogens) and also in the synthesis of the adrenal hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone.
  • It’s used in to metabolize vitamins A, D, E, and K (the fat soluble vitamins)
  • It is used in the reactions that synthesize vitamin D from sunlight.
  • It’s essential for maintaining the outer structural layer of your cells and also for keeping the cell membranes permeable so that certain molecules can pass through the membrane and enter the cell.

In order to travel through your bloodstream, it needs to have a protein coating and thus becomes something called a “lipoprotein.” They are called lipoprotiens because they contain both protein and fat.

The four main types of these lipoproteins are:

  1. LDL or low density lipoproteins often called bad and are associated with an increased risk of heart disease when they are high
  2. Chylomicrons (triglycerides) consisting of approximately 90%  fat
  3. HDL or high density lipoproteins (often referred to as the “good cholesterol”) HDL is thought to “protect” the arteries from damage by carrying away LDL particles so they can’t build up on your artery walls.
  4. VLDL or very low-density lipoproteins (often referred to as a very bad form of lipoproteins) These particles are considered to have the highest risk of contributing to heart disease because they are small dense highly inflammatory particles that can damage artery walls.

The role of triglycerides…

Triglycerides are fat molecules that come from the fat in the foods we eat, or can be synthesized from carbohydrates that are not burned for energy. These triglycerides are stored in your body and released to be burned for energy when your body does not get enough food to meet it’s energy needs. The truth is that it is triglycerides that really increase the risk of heart disease!
Hypertriglyceridemia is a term used to refer to high levels of triglyceries in the blood and researchers now know that this is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High glycemic carbohydrates can raise levels of triglycerides and greatly increase risk of heart disease.

While this area is still somewhat controversial, it’s clear that triglycerides have a major role in heart disease and they are increased by sugar consumption. It makes sense for this reason to keep your intake of sugar and high glycemic carbohydrates low to avoid setting yourself up for cardiovascular disease.

A Complex Question…

Doctors have been taught to calculate your risk of heart disease using ratios of these lipoprotein particles. They have also been given guidelines for what the “safe” and “dangerous” levels are.  Now these guidelines have been called into question, as new information has changed what the medical community “thought” they knew!

Even though the question of  what is cholesterol is a complex one, you will see that terms like good  and bad cholesterol are misleading and inaccurate. All of these forms of this vital substance have their necessary roles. Instead we should be looking at the effects of chronic inflammation and how we can neutralize it, because it is really inflammation that causes heart disease!

References:

Curr Cardiol Rep. 2011 Dec;13(6):544-52. doi: 10.1007/s11886-011-0220-3.
The role of triglycerides in atherosclerosis. Talayero BG, Sacks FM.
Source: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. btalayer@hsph.harvard.edu

Eggs and Cholesterol – A Pervasive Nutritional Myth!

Many people have heard dire warnings about eggs and cholesterol, but is there any truth to this widely held belief at all? The answer is NO! Eggs have not been shown to significantly raise LDL (low density lipoproteins) levels when eaten in moderation. In fact eggs are actually be considered beneficial  when cooked and eaten properly and in moderate amounts.

eggs and cholesterol

Please note that the term LDL refers to the form considered by cardiologists to be “bad,”  however we will show in other posts that the idea of good and bad cholesterol is a misapplication of the science!.

Lipoproteins are another term for cholesterol. Thus HDL cholesterol is high density lipoproteins, and LDL is used  to refer to “low density lipoprotein.” The type that is believed by scientists to actually cause problems is called vldl cholesterol, (very low density lipoproteins). However even in this case the truth is more complicated than this and we will explain this as we go along.

The Facts about Eggs…

The fact is that egg yolks also contain lecithin which is a phosopholipid compound that actually lowers the amount your body absorbs. Thus the cholesterol in an egg does not have the same effect in your body, that it does when it comes from other sources.

Eggs contain about 185 milligrams of cholesterol (for a large egg), but they are also high in vitamin-d, choline (a b-vitamin) and lecithin. Interestingly, the saturated fat content in eggs is low. Research studies have shown that foods that you eat, does not have necessarily cause high cholesterol levels in your body, and in some cases may actually lower it!

It appears that the eggs and cholesterol myth began when the concern over lipoprotein levels being a factor in heart disease emerged. Researchers jumped to conclusions and people were warned that eggs greatly increased the risk of heart disease, based on this assumption, (based on poorly done research).

Eggs are Essential Sources of Choline

One negative result of this eggs and cholesterol hysteria was that people stopped eating eggs, or at least significantly cut down on egg consumption. The b-vitamin choline is essential to good health, especially of the brain.

The most abundant source of this vitamin in most people’s diets came from eggs. As a result the population as a whole became deficient in choline, leading to other serious health problems like Alzheimer’s Disease, and even increased rates of heart disease!

Choline is vital to the healthy function of the brain and nervous system, which in turn has a huge impact on heart health. Thus by limiting egg consumption and producing deficiency of choline in the diet, people were actually making the situation with regard to heart disease even worse!

What The Research Says…

Some people who have a genetic tendency toward higher levels called (familial hypercholesterolemia) may be affected by the amount they consume in their foods, but the mechanism is not totally clear. In fact the famous Framingham Study of heart disease shows that people with the highest hdl cholesterol levels actually lived the longest!

Recent research conducted on eggs and cholesterol at the University of Surrey by Dr. Bruce Griffin found that two eggs per day consumed by healthy people for a 12 week period actually lowered their LDL levels on average! It was concluded that eggs will not significantly raise cholesterol numbers in a healthy person. In this instance eggs actually lowered their levels!

In face the research subjects in the experimental group actually lost weight as well. This may seem surprising, but in light of the fact that egg yolks contains beneficial vitamins and high quality protein, it supplies your body with vital nutrients, without which you can’t achieve optimal health.

Recent research has also suggested that eggs may act in a way to reduce high blood pressure and that they contain antioxidants that help prevent heart disease. While this evidence is not yet conclusive, it suggests that eggs, far from being dangerous to our health are actually beneficial in preventing both cancer and heart disease!

Nutritional myths about eggs and cholesterol still persist in medicine and are accepted by the public at large, but gradually the word is getting out that eggs are not a bad food at all, in fact you need the beneficial nutrients in eggs for good health, including heart health!

References:

Chamila Nimalaratne, Daise Lopes-Lutz, Andreas Schieber, Jianping Wu. Free aromatic amino acids in egg yolk show antioxidant properties. Food Chemistry, 2011; 129 (1): 155 DOI:
Majumder et al. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides from Simulated in Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion of Cooked Eggs. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2009; 57 (2): 471 DOI: