High cholesterol symptoms are not something you are going to notice. In fact they are almost non existent! The real relationship between cholesterol and heart disease kind of forced me to write this article backwards.

high cholesterol symptomsThe truth is that high cholesterol (let’s call anything beyond about 280 mg/dl high) is itself a symptom of other medical problems. You see, cholesterol is made by the body and used in all sorts of important biochemical reactions, some having to do with healing and the immune system.

Cholesterol also serves as an antioxidant as well, and your body will make more of it when you are faced with any kind of a health crisis or trauma, because it’s part of the protective and healing systems of the body.

So when cholesterol is elevated, it can be an indicator that something is wrong in the body, and that the body is attempting to heal or correct the problem.

Are there any real high cholesterol symptoms?

The answer is yes, although it’s not something that you would feel or notice on a day to day basis. It can show up during an eye examination. Your eye doctor may notice a buildup of cholesterol deposits in your eyes.

This CAN be an indicator of high cholesterol (kind of a “silent symptom”) that is itself, a symptom of other medical problems.

Arcus Senilis

There is a condition that affects the eyes called Arcus Senilis where a white or gray ring develops around the cornea of the eye.  It CAN be caused by elevated cholesterol, but not always. The rings come from cholesterol deposits but may be due to a metabolic disorder, rather than very high levels of cholesterol.

If you notice these rings, of course you should have your eyes checked, but again, this does not mean that you necessarily have a high cholesterol level. You eye doctor may recommend that you see another specialist and have the necessary tests done to determine if indeed your lipid profile (fat levels) are really elevated.

In people over 40, this condition is not all that uncommon, but really isn’t a reason for concern. In younger people it can be due to something called familial hyperlipidemia, which is a genetic condition where the person tends to have high levels of fats in their blood. In any case, if you have this condition, the best strategy is to have an eye exam and a full blood lipid screening.

The bottom line is that Arcus Senilis is a normal occurrence after 40 years of age. It’s nothing to get stressed about, but just follow up and get your blood lipids tested by your doctor. If you are a young person, it may indicate a problem with cholesterol metabolism and again should be checked out and dealt with accordingly.

High Cholesterol Symptoms That Are Silent

Again, try not to think of “high cholesterol” in and of itself as THE problem. For the most part, it’s an indicator that your body is trying to deal with another problem and the elevation in cholesterol is just it’s way of doing so. This is known in medicine as “acquired hyperlipidemia,” which means high blood fats due to some medical condition that is causing elevations in your cholesterol levels.

Your body may increase it’s cholesterol levels in response to health issues like:

  • Vitamin-D deficiency
  • Hypothyroid (sluggish thyroid function)
  • Cushings Disease (which causes chronically elevated cortisol levels)
  • Anorexia
  • Problems with your hormones and metabolism
  • Kidney disease
  • Alcoholism and alcohol toxicity
  • Diabetes and pre-diabetes

Obviously these are serious medical conditions and if you have any of these issues, your doctor should be monitoring your blood lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides) on a constant basis.

Drugs that Affect Cholesterol Levels

  • Estrogen and Corticosteroids (can raise HDL and Triglycerides)
  • Oral Anabolic steroids ( lower HDL)
  • Birth Control (can raise cholesterol)
  • Beta Blockers (can raise triglycerides and lower HDL)
  • Thiazide Diuretics (can raise cholesterol and triglycerides)
  • Retinoids (can increase LDL and triglycerides)

Of course if you are on any of these medications, you will have to discuss the side effects and risk to benefit ratio with your doctor. Don’t just go off medications without consulting your doctor, because this can have serious consequences.

If you are searching for an healthier or less risky alternative to drugs, that’s great, but you have to do that under the guidance of a physician who knows your medical history and can help you do so safely.

High cholesterol symptoms are a sign that there are important health issues that you and your doctor need to be dealing with. Since most people get routine lipid screenings your doctor should be aware of your lipid profile and it’s implications, but always do your own research and work with your doctor to identify problem areas and find the healthiest solutions you can for them.

Cholesterol too low, how can this be a problem? We have all heard about the supposed relationship of heart disease to cholesterol levels, so we assume that lower is better. NOT SO!

cholesterol too lowEverything in your body is based on maintaining a balance, and cholesterol profiles are no exception.  Low cholesterol levels can be just as unhealthy as levels that are too high.

The belief that simply lowering cholesterol will protect you from heart attacks has been encouraged by the pharmaceutical industry and those medical professionals that serve it.  While cholesterol is a factor, there are other things involved such as inflammation, that make a big difference.

The risks of various serious medical conditions rise for those individuals having a total cholesterol level of under 160 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter).  That said, some experts recommend that the ideal is somewhere between 180mg/dl and 200mg/dl for total cholesterol, (but even this is subject to controversy)

What causes low cholesterol?

Cholesterol that’s too low can be caused by:

  • Use of statin drugs
  • Malnutrition
  • Malabsorption – inadequate absorption of nutrients from the intestines
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Liver dysfunction
  • Manganese deficiency
  • Celiac disease
  • Leukemia and other blood diseases

Please note:  Excessively low cholesterol levels need to be evaluated by a trained medical professional to determine the cause and the proper treatment. It is important not only to know what causes low cholesterol, but also having a proper treatment strategy in place to make sure you address it.

When you optimize cholesterol naturally, this is not a problem, because you are not trying to curtail your own body’s production of cholesterol, but rather preventing re-absorption through the large intestine.

You will NOT bring your cholesterol too low with this approach.

Effects of low cholesterol

Hypocholesterolemia – cholesterol too low, has been associated with a number of serious medical disorders such as:

  • Reduced production of your body’s steroid hormones
  • Increased risk of cancer
  • Increased risk of heart disease
  • Increased risk of strokes
  • Increased risk of depression/bipolar disorder
  • Increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Possible loss of memory
  • Increased risk of suicide
  • Increased risk of schizophrenia

Effects of low cholesterol are very serious, and you need to focus not on simply lowering cholesterol, but achieving a healthy level based on your individual biochemistry.  With cholesterol too low, many vital chemical processes can’t be completed properly.

Cholesterol too low? – So what is the right approach?

The correct approach is not to simply focus on lowering cholesterol, just as weight loss should not simply be about losing weight.  Rather than making your cholesterol too low, this process will allow you to achieve the right balance.

That process includes:

  • Proper eating
  • Proper exercise
  • Nutritional supplementation
  • Stress reduction

Proper eating should include foods that are low in cholesterol but also nutrient dense, and which contain plenty of fiber. This is because fiber can absorb excess cholesterol as it passes through the large intestine and is then excreted out of the body in the stool.  The recommended fiber consumption is about 25 grams per day for women and 38 grams per day for men.

Proper exercise is short and intense, like interval training, but ultimately should be moderated by the age and physical condition of the person doing it. Be cautious and seek professional guidance in setting up an exercise program if you are an older person, or if you have a serious medical condition.

Nutritional supplementation should include full spectrum vitamin and mineral formula. A high quality fish oil is also a key supplement that will lower your risk of heart disease and every other medical condition you can think of. Sufficient levels of omega 3 fatty acids are essential to good health, and fish oil supplies these.

Stress reduction uses various techniques to lower stress and promote relaxation and tranquility. Among these, grounding is one of the most effective. Other strategies like meditation, the speed trace, and various other relaxation techniques can be very effective.

Having your cholesterol too low is a risk factor for chronic disease. A balanced approach, rather than just low cholesterol levels is the answer. Doing the things mentioned above should allow you to naturally achieve the right balance.

Does red wine lower cholesterol?  The short answer is yes! When discussing what foods lower cholesterol the French Paradox with it’s red wine connection often comes up as one of the ways to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease. Let’s examine this a bit further to determine exactly what is happening in this case and if the connection is truly warranted.

does red wine lower cholesterol
We know that resveratrol supplements have many health benefits including the potential to lower cholesterol levels naturally. But does red wine which contains resveratrol have the same effect?

So once again, does red wine lower cholesterol? There are a number of factors to be considered in addition to the benefits of the poly-phenols and sapponins in the wine. You also have to factor in the fact that wine drinkers may be more affluent,  so they may  be able to afford to eat better, and be
more conscious about their health.

The French Paradox

The French Paradox is largely genetic! The MTHFR gene which predisposes people to heart disease and cancer is present in about 66% of the US population, while only 2-3% of the French carry this gene! With that said, lets examine why red wine may be beneficial in lowering cholesterol.

The strategy for those who have this gene defect is to supplement with a methylated form of folic acid called “methylfolate.” This will allow their bodies to properly absorb the folate and prevent the buildup of the toxic amino acid homocysteine.

Sapponins and LDL

There are glucose based compounds in red wine called sapponins, which bind with LDL and carry it out of the body, so that it cannot be reabsorbed and reprocessed through the liver. The poly-phenols in red wine also have antioxidant properties which help lower inflammation and prevent the
oxidation of LDL’s in your arteries.

This LDL binding and antioxidant effect is like a one-two punch against heart disease, and other chronic diseases, because as we know, inflammation is at the root of pretty much all chronic disease! Red wine does lower cholesterol but specifically LDL, and also helps to a small degree supply resveritrol which is another antioxidant that is protective against heart disease.

What Type of Red Wine?

Charles Poliquin the founder of the Biosignature method of optimal body composition recommends Sardian and Spanish red wines as the best. Charles is a world traveler and has extensive knowledge of how various foods affect the cardiovascular system.

Spanish and Sardian red wine are very rich in antioxidants that not only help lower LDL but also help with estrogen detoxification as well. A little is helpful but don’t ever do the wine as more is definitely not better.

Resveritrol Supplements

I would also add that resveratrol supplements are an even safer way to get the benefits of resveratrol and they are likely much more effective. It would take many bottles of wine to equal the amount of resveratrol in a couple of capsules of high quality resveratrol supplements. So for the person who
cannot drink, this is one of a number of safe ways to lower cholesterol. 250 mg per day has been recommended by Dr. Mark Houston associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University!

So does red wine lower cholesterol? The answer seems to be a definite yes, but you need to be doing all the other things like eating other foods to lower cholesterol, exercising, and avoiding trans fats, ect. as well.  So enjoy your red wine in moderation!

What are optimal cholesterol numbers? Doesn’t this contradict the latest theory that cholesterol does NOT cause heart disease. The truth is that it is a “factor” but not the “cause”!

cholesterol numbersHow do we establish what the optimal levels for LDL and HDL are? These are important questions because the idea that cholesterol specifically causes heart disease is so deeply ingrained in the average person (and most doctors as well).

This is a difficult question to answer definitively because the issue is just so complex. I can tell you what some of the guidelines are, and of course they vary from one source to another. There is a generally accepted “optimal range” for cholesterol numbers.

Here are the guidelines issued by the American Heart Association.

 

Desirable Borderline Risk High Risk
Total Cholesterol 200 or less 200-239 240 and over
HDL 60 or higher 40-59 40 or less (men)
HDL 60 or higher 50-59 50 or less (women)
LDL less than 100 130-159 160-189
Triglycerides less than 150 150-199 200-499

 

 

 

 

 

Keep in mind that these guidelines somewhat reflect the influence of the drug industry and their attempts to increase their market for cholesterol lowering drugs called “statins.”

The recommended cholesterol numbers keep being adjusted downward, in my opinion in order to get doctors to prescribe more statin drugs which of course boots revenues of the drug industry.

In addition, there are other tests which are called “inflammatory markers,” that have a direct bearing on your risk for developing heart disease, and these tests should also be used to more accurately determine what your overall risk of cardiovascular disease is.

Once you know your level of risk based on the latest tests and analysis of particle types, then you can target your lifestyle strategies (exercise, diet, and stress reduction) to protect your heart health. This should always be the end point of ANY testing…a program to address whatever risks the tests have identified.

What really DOES Causes Heart Disease?

Here’s a simplified explanation. Heart disease is caused by inflammation. That is what actually damages the lining of your arteries. As Dr. Stephen Sinatra likes to say “Cholesterol is found at the scene of the crime, but it’s not the perpetrator!”

When arteries are damaged, your body uses LDL to try and repair the damage, kind of like patching holes in a wall. Obviously the LDL did not cause the damage, but gets attached to the artery walls and accumulates eventually clogging the artery. This is called an “occlusion.”

When the LDL particles that stick to your arteries become oxidized and thus inflammatory, the process of arteriosclerosis begins. This is where the small highly inflammatory LDL particles called HP(a) come in.

So again, the cholesterol did not initiate the process of heart disease, but it IS an important factor in the progression of heart disease. With that out of the way, lets move on…

Focus on Particle Size and Type, Not Just Cholesterol Numbers

The real focus should be on the type and particle size NOT just the levels. According to Dr. Stephen Sinatra, an integrative cardiologist who is board certified by the American College of Cardiology, if your LDL particles are large and fluffy then you really don’t need to worry so much about your LDL levels.

However if the LDL’s are small dense highly inflammatory particles, then your risk is greatly elevated. There is a test that measures for these small inflammatory particles (HP(a)), called the Lipoprotein Particle Profile (LPP) test.

The LPP test measures the level of HP(a) which is a small dense LDL particle which is very toxic and inflammatory to the blood, potentially causing your blood to become “hyper-coagulated” which is another word for sticky and more likely to clot.

The takeaway message is that if you have this dangerous inflammatory LDL particle, then obviously the higher your total cholesterol numbers, the more of this dangerous particle you have, and the greater your risk. Simply stated, high levels matter when you have dangerous LDL particles in your blood.

So in closing, optimal cholesterol numbers are totally dependent on particle size and type. If your cholesterol particles are the small dense inflammatory type, then you need to make a greater effort to lower your levels.

If your LDL type is large and non-inflammatory, then your total levels are not something to be overly concerned about. You should take the time to consult with an integrative cardiologist to determine how best to manage your heart health.

Eggs and Cholesterol – A Pervasive Nutritional Myth!

Many people have heard dire warnings about eggs and cholesterol, but is there any truth to this widely held belief at all? The answer is NO! Eggs have not been shown to significantly raise LDL (low density lipoproteins) levels when eaten in moderation. In fact eggs are actually be considered beneficial  when cooked and eaten properly and in moderate amounts.

eggs and cholesterol

Please note that the term LDL refers to the form considered by cardiologists to be “bad,”  however we will show in other posts that the idea of good and bad cholesterol is a misapplication of the science!.

Lipoproteins are another term for cholesterol. Thus HDL cholesterol is high density lipoproteins, and LDL is used  to refer to “low density lipoprotein.” The type that is believed by scientists to actually cause problems is called vldl cholesterol, (very low density lipoproteins). However even in this case the truth is more complicated than this and we will explain this as we go along.

The Facts about Eggs…

The fact is that egg yolks also contain lecithin which is a phosopholipid compound that actually lowers the amount your body absorbs. Thus the cholesterol in an egg does not have the same effect in your body, that it does when it comes from other sources.

Eggs contain about 185 milligrams of cholesterol (for a large egg), but they are also high in vitamin-d, choline (a b-vitamin) and lecithin. Interestingly, the saturated fat content in eggs is low. Research studies have shown that foods that you eat, does not have necessarily cause high cholesterol levels in your body, and in some cases may actually lower it!

It appears that the eggs and cholesterol myth began when the concern over lipoprotein levels being a factor in heart disease emerged. Researchers jumped to conclusions and people were warned that eggs greatly increased the risk of heart disease, based on this assumption, (based on poorly done research).

Eggs are Essential Sources of Choline

One negative result of this eggs and cholesterol hysteria was that people stopped eating eggs, or at least significantly cut down on egg consumption. The b-vitamin choline is essential to good health, especially of the brain.

The most abundant source of this vitamin in most people’s diets came from eggs. As a result the population as a whole became deficient in choline, leading to other serious health problems like Alzheimer’s Disease, and even increased rates of heart disease!

Choline is vital to the healthy function of the brain and nervous system, which in turn has a huge impact on heart health. Thus by limiting egg consumption and producing deficiency of choline in the diet, people were actually making the situation with regard to heart disease even worse!

What The Research Says…

Some people who have a genetic tendency toward higher levels called (familial hypercholesterolemia) may be affected by the amount they consume in their foods, but the mechanism is not totally clear. In fact the famous Framingham Study of heart disease shows that people with the highest hdl cholesterol levels actually lived the longest!

Recent research conducted on eggs and cholesterol at the University of Surrey by Dr. Bruce Griffin found that two eggs per day consumed by healthy people for a 12 week period actually lowered their LDL levels on average! It was concluded that eggs will not significantly raise cholesterol numbers in a healthy person. In this instance eggs actually lowered their levels!

In face the research subjects in the experimental group actually lost weight as well. This may seem surprising, but in light of the fact that egg yolks contains beneficial vitamins and high quality protein, it supplies your body with vital nutrients, without which you can’t achieve optimal health.

Recent research has also suggested that eggs may act in a way to reduce high blood pressure and that they contain antioxidants that help prevent heart disease. While this evidence is not yet conclusive, it suggests that eggs, far from being dangerous to our health are actually beneficial in preventing both cancer and heart disease!

Nutritional myths about eggs and cholesterol still persist in medicine and are accepted by the public at large, but gradually the word is getting out that eggs are not a bad food at all, in fact you need the beneficial nutrients in eggs for good health, including heart health!

References:

Chamila Nimalaratne, Daise Lopes-Lutz, Andreas Schieber, Jianping Wu. Free aromatic amino acids in egg yolk show antioxidant properties. Food Chemistry, 2011; 129 (1): 155 DOI:
Majumder et al. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides from Simulated in Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion of Cooked Eggs. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2009; 57 (2): 471 DOI: